Honed

Radiant Pavillion ‘Insights’ Presentation

 

I made a presentation during the ‘Insights’ day back in September 2015. This series of presentations was as a part of the Radiant Pavillion Jewellery and Object Trail in Melbourne, Australia.

For my presentation, I focused on one of these exhibitions in particular – ‘Honed’- in order to explain my curatorial approach and share insights into the practice of some of my favourite jewellery artists.

A written version of this presentation is now available to read here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By6jwf76-bW6Y0lkVzFITXFheUk/view?usp=sharing

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View and download the Honed catalogue online

 

https://honedexhibitioncatalogue.wordpress.com/

 

The Honed exhibition features a select group of jewellery and/or object makers who are, or in the process of, becoming masters of a particular technique. Each uses a different technique and materials, and has spent many hours crafting the pieces on display. This exhibition aims to make explicit the labour and skill that has gone into creating the pieces. It considers time intensive art practices and how the outcome develops through this process.

Each of the makers has be interviewed regarding the technique and materials they use in order to provide insight into the maker’s process, choices, frustrations and successes. Their responses are included in a catalogue (created by Grace Garton) that can be downloaded here. This information and addition information about the artist’s practices can be viewed on the blog.

 

Exhibiting artists:

Andrea Williams

Bic Tieu

Jessica Winchcombe

Kallia Chatzigianni

Karin Jakobsson

Kenny Son

Melanie West

Oliver Smith

Satoshi Nakamura

Taisuke Nakada

 

The Honed exhibition will open on January 22nd and continues to February 2nd. See the Honed exhibition page for address and opening hours.

Grace Garton

Grace Garton

Grace Garton

 

Grace Garton is a free-lance artist, designer and maker based in Tasmania. She was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1964. After graduating in bachelor of visual arts at City Art Institute, Sydney in 1985, she took up as an assistant animator at Hana Barbera in Sydney. Between 1987 and 2014 Grace has worked for many animation studios around Australia and worked as a freelance illustrator for studios and individuals overseas.

In 2007 Grace started her own small business making and selling her art and dolls. Her work has sold all over the world and has been published in several overseas magazines.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/littleblackcrow

http://littleartycraftycrow.blogspot.com.au/

http://gracegarton.blogspot.com.au/

 

Grace created the catalogue for the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

Melanie West

Melanie West

Melanie West

 

What process did you use to make the pieces? Most of my work is formed, carved and laminated, using various types of polymer… polymer clays, epoxy clays, sometimes resins. For my more sculptural pieces, I form an armature with a light polymer material, cure it, and then refine the form by carving it. Once the armature is complete, I laminate it with polymer clay canes (similar to the millefiori technique used in glass work). Once the final piece is cured (often after multiple curings), my work is sanded and buffed.

 

 

What is the idea behind the pieces? All my work is inspired by the natural world. I am educated as a scientist, but the foundation of my work draws mostly from many summers of my childhood spent on an island in Maine, with ample time to wander and explore the natural world.

Lately I have been really drawn to magnets as well as polymer. To me, they are magic…an unseen force that is magically drawn to the opposite side of itself. So, I have been trying to incorporate more magnets into the functionality of my jewelry…often to add to the surprise and mystery of my work.

 

Would you mind sharing  a particular memories of a time spent in the natural world in Maine?  The small 40 acre island I spent my summers on (seven weeks every summer!) as a child, is in Penobscott Bay, Maine. No one else lived there. It was very primitive… there was no phone, electricity, or running water. So, my parents had to work to keep us four kids occupied… My mom had baskets of art materials she would pull out, which my siblings devoured. I tended to hang around my mom, who set up a large fish tank just above the tide line, then at low tide she would wander through the sea weed, and wade into the shallows and pick things out that interested her. She would place these finds in her tank of water, then pull out her microscope and various field guides, and ooh and ah at what she found. I, of course, had to see what all the fuss was about.  As I got older, I started digging under the sea weed myself.  I also got into bird watching and mushrooming with my dad. But looking through that old microscope has stuck with me ever since.

 

Artist’s website

 

Melanie will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

Additional information about Melanie’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.

Melanie will also be exhibiting in Perfect mutations from 08 July to 19 July 2015.

Invitation for exhibition series

Kallia Chatzigianni

Kallia Chatzigianni

Kallia Chatzigianni

 

Material and technique: I use heat to burn and perforate the fabrics creating holes of varying sizes and shapes. I then embroider the fabric and perforate it again, following the pattern created by the embroidery.

I also experiment with colorizing metal techniques using fire, patinas, flux, solder, plastic, colour pencils, oil pastels. After the colorization of the metal I engrave it using a micromotor and burs.

 

Ideas and inspiration: I studied history and archaeology and dealt professionally in these fields as well as in the field of archives. Consequently the concepts of memory, time, damage run, more or less obviously, through my work. The perforated leaves of my necklaces, the deconstructed and then trimmed with embroidery fabric express my feeling about the past, the threads of the weft of history that reach us.

The movement of the bur on the oxidized or patinated metal and the walk of thread on the fabric, is my way of creating personal alphabets, secret scripts and words, traces and imprints. Many of my jewelry pieces are mere reminders of moments, thoughts, and emotions.

 

Artist’s website

 

Kallia will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

Additional information about Kallia’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.

Kallia will also be exhibiting in Perfect mutations from 08 July to 19 July 2015 and Moving towards light from 02 September to 22 September 2015. 

Taisuke Nakada

Taisuke Nakada

Taisuke Nakada

 

The inspiration for my jewellery is a person’s near affairs in life. For example, eating a meal, sitting down to study or socialising with others.

I hope that my jewellery will have some impact on the person who is wearing it. Iron is a familiar and homely material but it has power.

It takes me about 3 or 4 days of work to finish one piece of jewellery. Iron is a very hard material. So it takes a lot of work to shape it.

Iron is used by all people in a variety of household wares. It is a very familiar material to us. It is not special but my work draws attention to its qualities.

Please do touch, wear and have fun with the jewellery that I have made. It will make me happy to see you interacting with my work.

 

Artist’s website

 

Taisuke will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

Additional information about Taisuke’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.

Taisuke will also be exhibiting in Perfect mutations from 08 July to 19 July 2015 and Moving towards light from 02 September to 22 September 2015. 

Karin Jakobsson

Karin Jakobsson

 

Material and technique: Hundreds of sheets of coloured tissue paper are cut to size, collated into rhythmical layers of colour, bound and immersed in archival glue. Once saturated, the paper is compressed and air-dried over a number of weeks. The dried blocks of layered paper are then roughed-out and carved into expressive forms. Carving, filing and polishing this material reveals interesting colour combinations and textural effects. The tools I use range from wood carving chisels to course files, and high-speed cutting bits and sanding papers using a flexi-drive.

Some of the pieces are made using a by-product of the layered paper process. The archival glue becomes coloured with dye, which has leaked from the tissue paper. This is left to dry over a number of weeks then used as a material to carve from.

 

Ideas and inspiration: ‘Voyage of the Mother-of-millions’ (2006) was the first time I made the layered paper material to express the colour and texture of a succulent plant called the Mother-of-millions, a garden exotic from Madagascar that colonises arid landscapes around the Pacific Rim, displacing native species.

‘Strong Sunlight’ (2009) carved from of hundreds of layers of tissue paper, with a slice of silver through the middle to express the bright light that is experienced in coastal Australia

‘Succulent Skin’ (2010) is part of a small series inspired by another foreign succulent which turns pink around the edges in drought conditions. This ring is about the effect ultra violet light can have on human skin. The leaf of this ring is made of dyed archival glue and is UV sensitive.

 

Karin will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

Additional information about Karin’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.

Karin will also be exhibiting in Perfect mutations from 08 July to 19 July 2015 and Moving towards light from 02 September to 22 September 2015. 

Bic Tieu

Bic Tieu

Bic Tieu

 

Material and technique:  The work in this exhibition combines several material processes. The substrate comprising of metal work that is hand constructed. The surface design is expressed through copper etching and patination. Each vessel and wearable is then finished with Japanese lacquer processes.

 

Ideas and inspiration: Some of the works comment on the particular ornateness to urban gardening aesthetics inspired by Japanese house gardens. The surfaces are articulated with floral designs using some traditional techniques to capture the vibrant hues of pink found in copper. Other works, particularly, the vessels, capture customary practice of giving. How symbolic offerings and gestures in my personal culture are translated through associated objects. These vessels I create, act as metaphors to translate these notions through the surface design and edge of the vessel.

 

Artist’s website

 

Bic will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

 

Additional information about Bic’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.

Oliver Smith

Oliver Smith

Oliver Smith

 

Technique and materials: I developed a modelling material in collaboration with Peter Smith of Darent Wax that is suitable for digital scanning. I then worked with Ben Tam of Qubic to scan the sculpture. Ben Farago of Rapid Prototyping Services handled the lost wax casting stage. Post casting finishing I did by hand in my workshop.

 

Ideas and inspiration: My kianpraty is a mythical creature conjured from the depths of the imagination and given form through an amalgam of known animal features and characteristics. In scale the periapts are embryonic, referencing the specimen in a jar and the talismanic miniature idol. The idol in turn points to larger religious sculptures and the shift from the personal to the social. Another much larger version can perhaps manifest itself in future as a monumental kianpraty archon.

 

Artist’s website

 

Oliver will exhibiting in the Honed exhibition in the Unlimited Substance series from 23 January to 02 February 2015.

 

Additional information about Oliver’s practice can be viewed at the Honed exhibition catalogue blog.